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afrolez:

Celebrating the 80th Anniversary of the Birth of the Legendary Brilliant Musician and International Human Rights Activist Nina Simone (February 21, 1933 - April 21, 2003) ~ PRESENTE

Jazz is a white term to define black people. My music is black classical music…

I had spent many years pursuing excellence, because that is what classical music is all about… Now it was dedicated to freedom, and that was far more important.

leebasays:

grapefruitfit:


Ernestine Shepherd, in shape at age 74
The Baltimore woman is listed in the 2010 and 2011 Guinness World Records as the oldest competitive female bodybuilder in the world.
“Believe it or not, I used to be a couch potato,” Ernestine Shepherd says. She became a competitive bodybuilder in her 70s.
 Marvin Joseph / The Washington Post 


I’m basically in love with this woman.
leebasays:

grapefruitfit:


Ernestine Shepherd, in shape at age 74
The Baltimore woman is listed in the 2010 and 2011 Guinness World Records as the oldest competitive female bodybuilder in the world.
“Believe it or not, I used to be a couch potato,” Ernestine Shepherd says. She became a competitive bodybuilder in her 70s.
 Marvin Joseph / The Washington Post 


I’m basically in love with this woman.

leebasays:

grapefruitfit:

Ernestine Shepherd, in shape at age 74

The Baltimore woman is listed in the 2010 and 2011 Guinness World Records as the oldest competitive female bodybuilder in the world.

“Believe it or not, I used to be a couch potato,” Ernestine Shepherd says. She became a competitive bodybuilder in her 70s.

I’m basically in love with this woman.

"Black" Mary Fields started life as a slave in Hickman County,Tenn in 1832. When she gained her freedom after the Civil War. Although she may have been one of the toughest women ever to work in a convent, 'Black Mary' had earned the respect and devotion of most of the residents of the pioneer community of Cascade, Montana, before she died in 1914. In fact, Mary Fields was widely beloved. She was admired and respected throughout the region for holding her own and living her own way in a world where the odds were stacked ...against her. In a time when African Americans and women of any race enjoyed little freedom anywhere in the world, Mary Fields enjoyed more freedom than most white men.

feministhistorian:

Living for the Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations, 1968–1980 by Kimberly Springer.

About the book:

The first in-depth analysis of the black feminist movement, Living for the Revolution fills in a crucial but overlooked chapter in African American, women’s, and social movement history. Through original oral history interviews with key activists and analysis of previously unexamined organizational records, Kimberly Springer traces the emergence, life, and decline of several black feminist organizations: the Third World Women’s Alliance, Black Women Organized for Action, the National Black Feminist Organization, the National Alliance of Black Feminists, and the Combahee River Collective. The first of these to form was founded in 1968; all five were defunct by 1980. Springer demonstrates that these organizations led the way in articulating an activist vision formed by the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality.

The organizations that Springer examines were the first to explicitly use feminist theory to further the work of previous black women’s organizations. As she describes, they emerged in response to marginalization in the civil rights and women’s movements, stereotyping in popular culture, and misrepresentation in public policy. Springer compares the organizations’ ideologies, goals, activities, memberships, leadership styles, finances, and communication strategies. Reflecting on the conflicts, lack of resources, and burnout that led to the demise of these groups, she considers the future of black feminist organizing, particularly at the national level. Living for the Revolution is an essential reference: it provides the history of a movement that influenced black feminist theory and civil rights activism for decades to come.

Also recommend checking out Separate Roads to Feminism: Black, Chicana, and White Feminist Movements in America’s Second Wave by Benita Roth.

(Source: lipsredasroses)

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