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Free Lynne Stewart Now! Rally in New York City Thursday, August 8 12:00 Noon to 2:00 PM

Free Lynne Stewart Now!
Rally in New York City
Thursday, August 8
12:00 Noon to 2:00 PM
Foley Square, 39 Center Street
Lower Manhattan, NYC

Rally in park across from Federal Court Building, Department of Justice and Bureau of Prisonsduring the hearing on Lynne’s case.
Take trains: J/Z, 4/5/6 to Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall.

Rally to have Lynne Stewart’s sentence overturned by Judge who, in 2010, re-sentenced her to 10 years from 28 months.
The following is a synopsis of what transpired at recent court date:

*Lynne Stewart’s attorneys filed an emergency Motion (2255) with Judge Koeltl seeking Lynne’s “immediate conditional release” pending consideration of the legal issues presented in their brief.

*Judge asked why they chose to exhaust their one time right to an emergency motion? The Defense response was that Lynne Stewart is terminally ill. The luxury of time is not available to her or her counsel. An expeditious response from the Court is imperative in the face of her medical condition and in the light of the Bureau of Prisons’ unwarranted denial of her application for compassionate release and protracted delays that could be expected if she submitted another application.

*The Prosecution, acting for the Justice Department of Barack Obama, asserted that the Judge has no standing because there is no motion for Compassionate Release before him from Federal Bureau of Prisons Director Charles E. Samuels, Jr. as specified in the 1984 Sentencing Act.

*The Defense presented a Brief which documents that the Federal Bureau of Prisons violated separation of powers, as the 1984 Congressional Statute assigns to the Court the right to modify a prison sentence in light of facts not available at the time of trial, notably those pertaining to terminal illness: “The BOP has implemented its own interpretation and refused to notify the sentencing judge of objectively ‘extraordinary and compelling circumstances,’ including but not limited to imminent death, unless, in its own judgment, a motion should be granted. Between 2000 and 2008, on average, 21.3 motions were filed each year. In about 24% of those motions, the prisoner died before the district court ever had a chance to rule on the motion.”

*”Lynne Stewart is dying,” wrote her attorneys. She does not want to die in prison or become another statistic of someone who dies while the Bureau of Prisons delays its reconsideration of another application for compassionate release that she plans to file soon.

*Judge Koeltl gave a directive to the Federal Attorney to set out its case by August 6 and also to explain why the Bureau of Prisons has refused to disclose or release the records that provide the basis for its denial of Lynne Stewart’s recent application for compassionate release.

Lynne Stewart’s defense attorneys will have one day to answer before the next hearing scheduled for Thursday, August 8 at 12 p.m.

Judge Koeltl has the authority to mandate immediate conditional release to Lynne Stewart.
Lynne Stewart’s condition is deteriorating rapidly.


• Join Archbishop Desmond Tutu, former Attorney General Ramsey Clark, Dick Gregory, Alice Walker, Bianca Jagger, Pete Seeger, Ed Asner, Father Miguel D’Escoto Brockmann, Daniel Berrigan, Daniel Ellsberg, Noam Chomsky, and 25,000 others in the United States and internationally who have signed the petition to free Lynne Stewart – at www.lynnestewart.org.

PLEASE CONSIDER HOLDING A RALLY IN YOUR COMMUNITY.
Contact Ralph Poynter at (917) 853-9759 for more information. 

http://WED 7/24!! HANDS OFF BROOKLYN HOSPITALS!

equalityforflatbush:

WED 7/24!! HANDS OFF BROOKLYN HOSPITALS!

Join patients, community supporters, elected leaders, NYSNA & 1199SEIU to mourn the death of healthcare in Brooklyn.

Several Brooklyn hospitals, including Interfaith Medical Center and Long Island College Hospital, are under threat of closure.

Meanwhile, health disparities in our borough are climbing at alarming rate. Low income, people of color, and the uninsured have fewer and fewer options for receiving care.

We’ll meet at Cadman Plaza at 4pm and march over the bridge and then hold a rally at City Hall in Manhattan at 5pm.

Make no mistake - if any of our hospitals close, people will die.

Let’s march and mourn to stop the death of Brooklyn healthcare!

Wear black!

NYC, Nov. 21: “Red Dawn” is RACIST War Propaganda; Korea Wants Peace!

Wed., Nov. 21, 5:00 PM, Times Square

We will assemble in front of :

Regal Stadium 13 Movie Theater
247 West 42nd Street, New York, NY
 
ON NOV. 21st the film “Red Dawn” will be released in theaters throughout the United States. This film is vile, racist, war propaganda and must be opposed by all progressive minded people.

THE FILM IS A REMAKE of a 1980s movie of the same name, made to justify U.S. murder in Latin America. While the U.S. funded death squads in Nicaragua, El Salvador, and elsewhere, this Hollywood fantasy portrayed the U.S. as being in danger of invasion by Cuba and the Soviet Union. The original film was the favorite of fascists like Timothy McVeigh and David Duke.

THIS NEW VERSION of the film has chosen the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea as a target. It portrays the Koreans are brutal invaders of the U.S., and people in the U.S. fighting them. The exact opposite is the reality.

DURING THE KOREAN WAR, millions of Korean people were murdered by U.S. imperialism. In the North, every building above one story in height was bombed. The U.S. military committed horrific atrocities, burning people alive, as well as raping and slaughtering civilians. The U.S. even threatened to drop five atomic bombs on China because they dared come to the aid of the Korean people.

FOR DECADES THE U.S. supported the brutal dictatorship of Syngman Rhee in South Korea who murdered his people en masse, backed up by U.S. troops and millions of dollars in foreign aid. U.S. troops still occupy South Korea. There have been mass protests against the U.S. military bases, but still they remain. Labor unions in South Korea are violently suppressed. Many people in South Korea are in prison simply for advocating peace with their northern countryfolk.

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE NORTHERN HALF of the Korean Peninsula has no desire to invade the United States. They are seeking to re-unite their country and remove the foreign invaders. The Korean Workers Party, a revolutionary communist organization, leads the country, and it has ensured housing and jobs for all the people. Until the collapse of the Soviet Union, its major trading partner, it had a booming socialist economy with a higher standard of living than most Asian countries. The Workers’ Party adheres to the principles of anti-imperialism, socialism and independence laid down by its founder, Kim Il Sung. Kim is still revered by the Korean people for leading the struggles against Japanese colonial occupation and U.S. imperialism.

FILMS SUCH AS RED DAWN are designed to justify U.S. military spending. While schools, food stamps, financial aid, and other programs people depend on are being cut, the U.S. has the largest military budget of any country on earth. Military corporations make trillions of dollars from manufacturing the tanks, fighter planes, and drones used to threaten and murder people around the world.
Join us in making clear: “RED DAWN IS WAR PROPAGANDA! KOREA WANTS PEACE!”

we-wretched-shall-rise:

SIGNAL BOOST!

PLEASE SUPPORT HOUSELESS DISABLED QUEER BLACK ORGANIZER FROM POLICE TERRORISM!

Tequilah is my friend and comrade, who I first met in Occupy Portland. They’re black, queer, and houseless, and their partner Joel was just brutalized and jailed with a phony felony charge (assaulting a police officer) by the Portland Police Bureau. Joel is queer, black, houseless, autistic, and also an organizer.

Tequilah is an amazing leader and organizer in the houseless community, and is well known and loved throughout the QPOC/houseless community in Portland.

This is another case of white supremacy terrorizing houseless queer people of color through the police. In Portland, the houseless community has been engaged in a tense multi-year land struggle with the city. They have self-organized free shelters, and the city has been trying to evict them. This struggle has been engaged through marches, protests, vigils, sleep-ins, and even a 55-day hunger strike by local houseless queer black activist Cameron Whitten.

Tequilah has always been an unstoppable force for justice in the houseless community, and the police are clearly targeting him and his partner to shut them down. He’s been there for me when I needed an emotional lift so many times, we can’t let the pigs attack him and his partner this way! It’s time to escalate the fight in this war for housing and against the police.

QPOC FIGHT BACK, FREE ALL POLITICAL PRISONERS!

SUPPORT THE HOUSELESS COMMUNITY IN PORTLAND @ RIGHT 2 DREAM TOO (R2D2), TELL THE CITY TO BACK OFF!

Please spread the word.

———————————————

Update: It has now been five days, and Joel is still in custody. They have not been heard from and PPB has not released a visitor list. The last time Joel was arrested, PPB knocked out several of his teeth.

EMERGENCY RALLY on SUNDAY at the MULTNOMAH COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER at NOON

(Source: new-here-again)

thepeoplesrecord:

Jamel Mims on facing two years in prison for protesting Stop & FriskOctober 23, 2012
New York City teacher Jamel Mims faces up to two years in prison for nonviolently protesting the most controversial racial profiling policy in America today. Last year, he was one of the key members of a civil disobedience campaign to stop Stop-and-Frisk that boasted the iconic academic Cornel West as one of its leading advocates. Today, he stands on trial along with 12 other campaigners.
As discussed in last week’s State of the Left, the NYPD policy involves 1,800 instances of stopping and frisking citizens every day; in the last decade, 87% of people who are stopped are black or Latino; and about 9 of 10 are innocent of any wrongdoing. There is not even a hint of exaggeration in saying that certain sections of New York City are turned into police states for minority youth.
Enter Jamel Mims:
On Tuesday October 23, I will be on trial along with Carl Dix, who, with Cornel West, initiated the 2011 campaign of nonviolent protest to stop Stop-and-Frisk. We are facing up to two years in jail for non-violent protest at the NYPD 103rd precinct in Jamaica, Queens last year.
The stakes are undoubtedly high: this is the second stop-and-frisk protest mass trial resulting from the culminating action of the civil disobedience campaign that sparked citywide resistance to the policy.  The Queens District Attorney added a serious misdemeanor charge on us last month, and re-wrote our charges last week so that we’re charged with ‘acting in concert’ rather than as individuals.
The action last November  was the third such protest at New York City precincts with the most stop-and-frisks, this one taking place in the borough of Queens. We held a community rally and march through Jamaica, Queens, which ended at the 103rd Precinct.  As our march arrived at the precinct, it was completely barricaded on all sides – on lock-down in anticipation of the protest.  An officer slides open one of the metal grates and motions us inward so that we may protest at the precinct doors.  After minutes of chanting and singing outside of the precinct steps, 20 of us were arrested, quite quickly, but held for hours late into the next day.  For less than ten minutes of protesting stop-and-frisk outside of the doors 103rd precinct, which houses the NYPD officers who put fifty shots into Sean Bell, 12 co-defendants and I now find ourselves facing two years of jail time.
If anyone think this is just an empty threat, and they won’t convict or send us to jail, let me reiterate—the DA has twice bumped up the charges in the last month, and has made it very clear that the prosecutorial apparatus intends to place us behind bars. A year ago, those who had no first-hand experience of the humiliation of being illegally searched barely knew the practice occurred.  Those who got stopped and frisked thought there was nothing one could do about it. Now, the stop-and-frisk policy and the horrors it inflicts are going viral in mainstream society. Copwatch and videos of NYPD stops garner thousands of views, and nearly every day there are articles or opinion pieces about stop-and-frisk.  Potential mayoral candidates have even had to confront this, as politicians line up to claim their opposition to the policy, or express their desire to reform or modify it in the ongoing pursuit of public opinion.
In this watershed moment, when stop-and-frisk is opening a window into the daily plight of thousands, the very people who put their bodies on the line to put this issue into the spotlight and openly call out for its abolition are vigorously prosecuted and threatened with incarceration.  I refuse to accept this.  It’s unthinkable that the Queens District Attorney, who couldn’t make a case against the cops who murdered Sean Bell, is now throwing the book at nonviolent civil disobedience protesters.  In this light, the intended effect of this prosecution is insidiously transparent: to send a chilling effect through the movement against mass incarceration, and dampen the spirit of resistance it has ignited.  To put it quite simply: don’t speak up, and certainly don’t fight back.
Well, I’m speaking up.  And not just as someone who is passionate about the issue.  I speak as a target of police abuse, as a Fulbright Scholar whose scholarship was almost denied after being assaulted by Boston police while trying to leave a party. I speak to you as an artist and teacher whose work in New York City public schools has me witness the humiliation and degradation of the youth by the NYPD on a daily basis.  I speak to you as a committed opponent of the New Jim Crow, a system of mass incarceration that has 2.4 million mostly black and Latino men warehoused in prisons across the nation, with stop-and-frisk as a major pipeline into that system.
Most of all, I speak to you as someone who has cast their lot with those at the bottom of society: with those thousands of youth who are brutalized, targeted, harassed, and shuffled off behind bars — and is now facing years in prison for standing with them.
We fully intend to stop this railroading by bringing the political battle into the courtroom and putting Stop and Frisk on trial.  If we are allowed to be convicted and jailed without a massive fight, then the battle against stop-and-frisk and the spirit of resistance it has engendered will be seriously dampened. On the other hand, if people stand with us in this legal battle–if we meet and defeat their attempts to silence and punish us–then the movement will gain further initiative and pull many more people into the struggle against mass incarceration.
SourcePhoto 1, 2
The United States police state imprisons all dissidents, from police brutality activists to government whistleblowers. 
thepeoplesrecord:

Jamel Mims on facing two years in prison for protesting Stop & FriskOctober 23, 2012
New York City teacher Jamel Mims faces up to two years in prison for nonviolently protesting the most controversial racial profiling policy in America today. Last year, he was one of the key members of a civil disobedience campaign to stop Stop-and-Frisk that boasted the iconic academic Cornel West as one of its leading advocates. Today, he stands on trial along with 12 other campaigners.
As discussed in last week’s State of the Left, the NYPD policy involves 1,800 instances of stopping and frisking citizens every day; in the last decade, 87% of people who are stopped are black or Latino; and about 9 of 10 are innocent of any wrongdoing. There is not even a hint of exaggeration in saying that certain sections of New York City are turned into police states for minority youth.
Enter Jamel Mims:
On Tuesday October 23, I will be on trial along with Carl Dix, who, with Cornel West, initiated the 2011 campaign of nonviolent protest to stop Stop-and-Frisk. We are facing up to two years in jail for non-violent protest at the NYPD 103rd precinct in Jamaica, Queens last year.
The stakes are undoubtedly high: this is the second stop-and-frisk protest mass trial resulting from the culminating action of the civil disobedience campaign that sparked citywide resistance to the policy.  The Queens District Attorney added a serious misdemeanor charge on us last month, and re-wrote our charges last week so that we’re charged with ‘acting in concert’ rather than as individuals.
The action last November  was the third such protest at New York City precincts with the most stop-and-frisks, this one taking place in the borough of Queens. We held a community rally and march through Jamaica, Queens, which ended at the 103rd Precinct.  As our march arrived at the precinct, it was completely barricaded on all sides – on lock-down in anticipation of the protest.  An officer slides open one of the metal grates and motions us inward so that we may protest at the precinct doors.  After minutes of chanting and singing outside of the precinct steps, 20 of us were arrested, quite quickly, but held for hours late into the next day.  For less than ten minutes of protesting stop-and-frisk outside of the doors 103rd precinct, which houses the NYPD officers who put fifty shots into Sean Bell, 12 co-defendants and I now find ourselves facing two years of jail time.
If anyone think this is just an empty threat, and they won’t convict or send us to jail, let me reiterate—the DA has twice bumped up the charges in the last month, and has made it very clear that the prosecutorial apparatus intends to place us behind bars. A year ago, those who had no first-hand experience of the humiliation of being illegally searched barely knew the practice occurred.  Those who got stopped and frisked thought there was nothing one could do about it. Now, the stop-and-frisk policy and the horrors it inflicts are going viral in mainstream society. Copwatch and videos of NYPD stops garner thousands of views, and nearly every day there are articles or opinion pieces about stop-and-frisk.  Potential mayoral candidates have even had to confront this, as politicians line up to claim their opposition to the policy, or express their desire to reform or modify it in the ongoing pursuit of public opinion.
In this watershed moment, when stop-and-frisk is opening a window into the daily plight of thousands, the very people who put their bodies on the line to put this issue into the spotlight and openly call out for its abolition are vigorously prosecuted and threatened with incarceration.  I refuse to accept this.  It’s unthinkable that the Queens District Attorney, who couldn’t make a case against the cops who murdered Sean Bell, is now throwing the book at nonviolent civil disobedience protesters.  In this light, the intended effect of this prosecution is insidiously transparent: to send a chilling effect through the movement against mass incarceration, and dampen the spirit of resistance it has ignited.  To put it quite simply: don’t speak up, and certainly don’t fight back.
Well, I’m speaking up.  And not just as someone who is passionate about the issue.  I speak as a target of police abuse, as a Fulbright Scholar whose scholarship was almost denied after being assaulted by Boston police while trying to leave a party. I speak to you as an artist and teacher whose work in New York City public schools has me witness the humiliation and degradation of the youth by the NYPD on a daily basis.  I speak to you as a committed opponent of the New Jim Crow, a system of mass incarceration that has 2.4 million mostly black and Latino men warehoused in prisons across the nation, with stop-and-frisk as a major pipeline into that system.
Most of all, I speak to you as someone who has cast their lot with those at the bottom of society: with those thousands of youth who are brutalized, targeted, harassed, and shuffled off behind bars — and is now facing years in prison for standing with them.
We fully intend to stop this railroading by bringing the political battle into the courtroom and putting Stop and Frisk on trial.  If we are allowed to be convicted and jailed without a massive fight, then the battle against stop-and-frisk and the spirit of resistance it has engendered will be seriously dampened. On the other hand, if people stand with us in this legal battle–if we meet and defeat their attempts to silence and punish us–then the movement will gain further initiative and pull many more people into the struggle against mass incarceration.
SourcePhoto 1, 2
The United States police state imprisons all dissidents, from police brutality activists to government whistleblowers. 

thepeoplesrecord:

Jamel Mims on facing two years in prison for protesting Stop & Frisk
October 23, 2012

New York City teacher Jamel Mims faces up to two years in prison for nonviolently protesting the most controversial racial profiling policy in America today. Last year, he was one of the key members of a civil disobedience campaign to stop Stop-and-Frisk that boasted the iconic academic Cornel West as one of its leading advocates. Today, he stands on trial along with 12 other campaigners.

As discussed in last week’s State of the Left, the NYPD policy involves 1,800 instances of stopping and frisking citizens every day; in the last decade, 87% of people who are stopped are black or Latino; and about 9 of 10 are innocent of any wrongdoing. There is not even a hint of exaggeration in saying that certain sections of New York City are turned into police states for minority youth.

Enter Jamel Mims:

On Tuesday October 23, I will be on trial along with Carl Dix, who, with Cornel West, initiated the 2011 campaign of nonviolent protest to stop Stop-and-Frisk. We are facing up to two years in jail for non-violent protest at the NYPD 103rd precinct in Jamaica, Queens last year.

The stakes are undoubtedly high: this is the second stop-and-frisk protest mass trial resulting from the culminating action of the civil disobedience campaign that sparked citywide resistance to the policy.  The Queens District Attorney added a serious misdemeanor charge on us last month, and re-wrote our charges last week so that we’re charged with ‘acting in concert’ rather than as individuals.

The action last November  was the third such protest at New York City precincts with the most stop-and-frisks, this one taking place in the borough of Queens. We held a community rally and march through Jamaica, Queens, which ended at the 103rd Precinct.  As our march arrived at the precinct, it was completely barricaded on all sides – on lock-down in anticipation of the protest.  An officer slides open one of the metal grates and motions us inward so that we may protest at the precinct doors.  After minutes of chanting and singing outside of the precinct steps, 20 of us were arrested, quite quickly, but held for hours late into the next day.  For less than ten minutes of protesting stop-and-frisk outside of the doors 103rd precinct, which houses the NYPD officers who put fifty shots into Sean Bell, 12 co-defendants and I now find ourselves facing two years of jail time.

If anyone think this is just an empty threat, and they won’t convict or send us to jail, let me reiterate—the DA has twice bumped up the charges in the last month, and has made it very clear that the prosecutorial apparatus intends to place us behind bars. A year ago, those who had no first-hand experience of the humiliation of being illegally searched barely knew the practice occurred.  Those who got stopped and frisked thought there was nothing one could do about it. Now, the stop-and-frisk policy and the horrors it inflicts are going viral in mainstream society. Copwatch and videos of NYPD stops garner thousands of views, and nearly every day there are articles or opinion pieces about stop-and-frisk.  Potential mayoral candidates have even had to confront this, as politicians line up to claim their opposition to the policy, or express their desire to reform or modify it in the ongoing pursuit of public opinion.

In this watershed moment, when stop-and-frisk is opening a window into the daily plight of thousands, the very people who put their bodies on the line to put this issue into the spotlight and openly call out for its abolition are vigorously prosecuted and threatened with incarceration.  I refuse to accept this.  It’s unthinkable that the Queens District Attorney, who couldn’t make a case against the cops who murdered Sean Bell, is now throwing the book at nonviolent civil disobedience protesters.  In this light, the intended effect of this prosecution is insidiously transparent: to send a chilling effect through the movement against mass incarceration, and dampen the spirit of resistance it has ignited.  To put it quite simply: don’t speak up, and certainly don’t fight back.

Well, I’m speaking up.  And not just as someone who is passionate about the issue.  I speak as a target of police abuse, as a Fulbright Scholar whose scholarship was almost denied after being assaulted by Boston police while trying to leave a party. I speak to you as an artist and teacher whose work in New York City public schools has me witness the humiliation and degradation of the youth by the NYPD on a daily basis.  I speak to you as a committed opponent of the New Jim Crow, a system of mass incarceration that has 2.4 million mostly black and Latino men warehoused in prisons across the nation, with stop-and-frisk as a major pipeline into that system.

Most of all, I speak to you as someone who has cast their lot with those at the bottom of society: with those thousands of youth who are brutalized, targeted, harassed, and shuffled off behind bars — and is now facing years in prison for standing with them.

We fully intend to stop this railroading by bringing the political battle into the courtroom and putting Stop and Frisk on trial.  If we are allowed to be convicted and jailed without a massive fight, then the battle against stop-and-frisk and the spirit of resistance it has engendered will be seriously dampened. On the other hand, if people stand with us in this legal battle–if we meet and defeat their attempts to silence and punish us–then the movement will gain further initiative and pull many more people into the struggle against mass incarceration.

Source
Photo 1, 2

The United States police state imprisons all dissidents, from police brutality activists to government whistleblowers

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

NYC ACTION ALERT: PREVENT MTA FROM BLOCKING ADS THAT OPPOSE RACISM - 10/11 - 3pm - pls spread the word

International Action Center

PRESS CONFERENCE IN FRONT OF MTA OFFICE

TO ANNOUNCE LEGAL ACTION TO PREVENT MTA FROM BLOCKING ADS THAT OPPOSE RACISM

Thurs, Oct 11, 3:00 PM

347 Madison bet 44th & 45th

On Thursday, at 3:00 PM in front of the MTA headquarters, anti-war activists, Muslim clergy and others will hold a press conference to announce legal action to prevent the MTA from blocking ads countering war, hate and racism.

Shown above, on left, is the ad the International Action Centercontracted and paid for, with a two-line disclaimer at the bottom saying the MTA does not endorse the content. Shown on the right is the redrafted MTA ad, with the disclaimer now taking up a full 1/4 of the ad space.

Originally scheduled to run in the subway on Monday, October 8, the anti-racist ads have still not been posted.

Earlier, the MTA was challenged for running insulting anti-Muslim ads that attack a substantial portion of its ridership in a Klan-like fashion. Claiming its “hands are tied” by a court order enforcing the right of free speech, the MTA has allowed the ugly racist ads to run.

The International Action Center then attempted to run ads countering Geller’s message of hate. The IAC’s ads denounce racism and affirm the values of unity and solidarity. They especially denounce anti-Muslim bigotry as a tool of war hysteria.

That’s when the MTA decided that the right of free speech was not important after all.

"The MTA has stalled, stymied and frustrated the attempts by the IAC to run anti-racist ads," said IAC director Sara Flounders. "In comparison, towards Geller’s ads the MTA’s arms were positively wide open — quite a feat given that its hands were tied."

Flounders raised $6,000 to have the unity-and-solidarity ads posted in the subway, and by Oct 1 had signed an agreement with the MTA stipulating that the ads would begin on Monday, October 8.

However, the MTA repeatedly changed the language of the disclaimer on the bottom of the ad. Finally, after stipulating a clear two-line MTA disclaimer at the bottom of the ad, the MTA approved final copy for the anti-racist ad on Oct 3.

The ad was printed and shipped to the MTA distributor and subway stations set for posting the ad. However, on the day the already printed ad was scheduled to be posted in subway stations, the MTA pulled the approved ad. The transit agency then, in breach of contract, re-designed the ad so that the disclaimer took up a full 25% of the ad space (see above).

Flounders noted it would take a struggle to get the MTA to do the right thing, emphasizing that the MTA’s actions supporting war propaganda and racism is an extension of its longstanding role in the promotion of militarism and repression.

"With S.W.A.T. teams armed with submachine guns and attack dogs patrolling the subway, the MTA has been a willing accomplice in the bogus ‘war on terror,’" said Flounders. "Now with racist anti-Muslim hysteria, the MTA has allowed the war plans of the 1% to take over what should be public transportation for the 99%."

-30-

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