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equalityforflatbush:

image Rally & Vigil - SUNDAY March 9th - JOIN Kimani Gray’s family and friends for  the 1 year anniversary  https://www.facebook.com/events/430008773758513/

On March 9, 2013 16 year old Kimani “Kiki” Gray was murdered by two plain clothes officers who failed to identified themselves. Sgt. Mourad Mourad and Officer Jovaniel Cordova shot at Kimani Gray 11 times, hitting Kimani with 7 bullets, three entered in his back. These officers also have racked up five suits which cost taxpayers $215,000. These suits were for Civil Rights Violations, including Stop and Frisk and False Arrests.

NYC MARCH 9th #OWS M9 OCCUPY AND JUSTICE FOR KIMANI | Facebook

equalityforflatbush:

On this day a year ago another young African life was taken from us by NYPD…we come together to remember Kimani Gray’s life and demand Justice for his murder…details forthcoming…

Brooklyn Speakout - 1/21 6pm [Where] Flatbush Reformed Church, 890 Flatbush Avenue (at Church Avenue) in Brooklyn, NY

equalityforflatbush:

JAN 21st - The Justice for Kyam Committee invites local community leaders and concerned citizens to come before their elected officials with their experiences of conditions in central booking. We do this in Kyam’s memory and in the hope that pre arraignment conditions will be improved. Come out and show your support to the family and help demand change from those who you’ve put into positions of power. This event is FREE. Refreshments will be served.

Rally for Kyam Lvingston DEC 21st 12NOON East 18th Street and Church Avenue in Brooklyn, NY

equalityforflatbush:

image
Kyam Livingston, a 37-year-old mom, died in Brooklyn Central Booking after NYPD officers ignored her pleas for medical assistance for 7 long hours. It has been 5 months since she passed, and still no one has been held accountable. Please join her family, friends, and neighbors in demanding justice as they struggle through their first Holiday season without Kyam.

equalityforflatbush:

Anita Neil and Supporters March For Kyam Livingston November 2013

"Our beloved Kyam Livingston was just 37 years old when she died while in Police custody on July 21, 2013. We believe Kyam lost her life due to medical neglect by the police, who arrested her over a non-violent family dispute, then ignored her repeated pleas for medical attention for several hours while she was awaiting arraignment in Brooklyn Central Bookings. This resulted in Kyam withering away in physical condition, ultimately succumbing to her complaints and passing away, despite pleas not only from her but from other suspects held in her cell—for hours on end— for someone to come to her aid.”  from  https://www.facebook.com/Justice4KyamLivingston

equalityforflatbush:

VIGIL FOR KYAM LIVINGSTON MONDAY OCT 21ST  6PM BROOKLYN CENTRAL BOOKING #WEWANTTHENAMES


To all those supporters who knew Kyam personally,


We need you to share your pictures, videos and happy stories about Kyam. Please send them out to our email address: Justice4Kyam@gmail.com. Let’s tell people about the person behind the Facebook images. So that who she really was is never forgotten. Thank you.
 
To all those who did not know Kyam but are standing by us,
 
Please send us a brief statement explaining why you support this cause. What is it about Kyam’s story that moved you to sign the petition, or attend the rally, or just say a prayer for the family? We need to hear from you at Justice4Kyam@gmail.com.
 
Those on twitter, if you tweet, then over the next couple of weeks, please tweet your support for the Justice for Kyam campaign and include the hashtags #WEWANTTHENAMES or #WHOKILLEDKYAM in the message.
 
Finally, the link below takes you to the flyer for our next event, please print it out and spread the word. We hope to see you there!

wearenottrayvonmartin:

I will never be Trayvon Martin. Look at me. I am a white-man from New York. I wear boat shoes and white t-shirts.

When I walk down the street in Brooklyn I am not seen as a street thug or a criminal, I am seen as normal.

I get all the things normal people expect to get - the cops don’t randomly stop and search me, strangers are generally respectful to me, and people in stores, restaurants, movie theaters etc. call me sir.

Oh yeah, no one has ever stalked me in their car and shot me to death and then been found innocent of any crime related to my death. The likelihood of that happening to me is zero. 

But I don’t need to be Trayvon Martin to know that what happened to him, and James Byrd, and countless other Black men is simply wrong. I don’t have to be Trayvon Martin to stand with those who are Trayvon and say enough is enough, not one more Black child killed.

I’m not Trayvon Martin and I oppose the racism that killed him, and kills him over and over. 

We need to change this country.

americaforward:

Don’t edit the Voting Rights Act - remember Bloody Sunday
On March 7th, 1965, state troopers attacked and beat 525 peaceful protesters marching for voter registration in Selma, Alabama. The horrific display of police brutality known as ‘Bloody Sunday’ spurred the passing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which ensured and protected the right to vote for millions of minorities in America. To remove any part of the Act, to take away any of the rights included in it, would be disrespectful to those who lost their lives fighting for it. 
americaforward:

Don’t edit the Voting Rights Act - remember Bloody Sunday
On March 7th, 1965, state troopers attacked and beat 525 peaceful protesters marching for voter registration in Selma, Alabama. The horrific display of police brutality known as ‘Bloody Sunday’ spurred the passing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which ensured and protected the right to vote for millions of minorities in America. To remove any part of the Act, to take away any of the rights included in it, would be disrespectful to those who lost their lives fighting for it. 
americaforward:

Don’t edit the Voting Rights Act - remember Bloody Sunday
On March 7th, 1965, state troopers attacked and beat 525 peaceful protesters marching for voter registration in Selma, Alabama. The horrific display of police brutality known as ‘Bloody Sunday’ spurred the passing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which ensured and protected the right to vote for millions of minorities in America. To remove any part of the Act, to take away any of the rights included in it, would be disrespectful to those who lost their lives fighting for it. 

americaforward:

Don’t edit the Voting Rights Act - remember Bloody Sunday

On March 7th, 1965, state troopers attacked and beat 525 peaceful protesters marching for voter registration in Selma, Alabama. The horrific display of police brutality known as ‘Bloody Sunday’ spurred the passing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which ensured and protected the right to vote for millions of minorities in America. To remove any part of the Act, to take away any of the rights included in it, would be disrespectful to those who lost their lives fighting for it. 

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