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Attempted ‘lynching’ no joke say parents of Black boys in Arkansas school incident

nuestrahermana:

glitterlion:

FinalCall.com) - Two students were expelled and seven suspended from Wynne High School in Wynne, Ark., but parents of two Black boys, who were victims in what parents call an attempted lynching, are furious, saying justice has not been done and their fear for the safety of their children.

Cheryl Webster said all sorts of things went through her mind but she hadn’t imagined what she was told. Some boys tried to hang Mickey, her child, and his teammate, MaKye McDaniel, with a noose during football practice.

She is furious because of the assault, incensed that school officials waited three days to notify her, and outraged because they illegally questioned Mickey without her presence or knowledge, she told The Final Call. Oddly, before she even knew what was happening, the principal and assistant principal were profusely apologizing, she recalled.

“This is worse than what I even thought it could be. What if my child would have been hung? The first thing they would have said was my son committed suicide. What kind of sh—-t, I mean, stuff is that,” Ms. Webster said, restraining herself from cursing and struggling to speak through pain and anger.

She recounted her 14-year-old son’s ordeal: On Sept. 24, another student called him to the back of the weight room. One boy lifted him up while another tried to put a noose across his head and he had to fight them off, she said. “I don’t care if you’re White or Black. What happened to my son should never have happened,” Ms. Webster declared.

“I never thought this would happen, especially not to my son because he’s a good kid, a good student. I’ve never had these fears before but I’m always going to be concerned because you never know, it might happen again. There’s not a day that goes by I don’t think about my son being in school,” she added.

During an Oct. 3 school board meeting, Superintendent Carl Easley read a statement from the suspended boys’ families, according to TV station WPTY in Memphis. “They apologize for the embarrassment to the school district. They apologize for any embarrassment and heartache they have caused the students,” he said, in an article published on the WPTY television’s website. According to Fox affiliate in Memphis, school officials labeled the incident a case of “extreme bullying.”

Final Call phone requests for interviews with Mr. Easley and the Wynne Public School Board were not been returned. Supt. Easley did say the high school’s administration thoroughly investigated the incident and found no criminal conduct, according to news reports. Wynne, Ark., is about an hour away from Memphis.

“I don’t care what they say. You can talk it around and spin it around all you want. I do not consider that horseplay. It wasn’t a joke to me. It wasn’t a joke to my family. It wasn’t a joke to the community either. That’s my child’s life,” Ms. Webster told The Final Call.

She wants the White players involved dismissed for the rest of the academic year. And, Ms. Webster declares, if the situation were reversed, her Black son would have been put in jail. She and Mickey’s father are discussing next steps but, for now, they are taking great care to protect their son.

“I can only imagine what goes through his head walking down that hallway at school, with people asking, ‘Was that you, Mickey? Was that true?’ He just wants to be left alone,” Ms. Webster said.

Rod McDaniel and his wife want to file criminal charges, but they don’t trust local police. Mr. McDaniel also wonders if his history of outspokenness on racial issues led to the targeting of his son, MaKye. He had complained publicly about an incident with White police officers the previous week.

“We want number one accountability and full maximum penalty for hate crimes and being involved in any crime, expulsions for the assaults, resignations of both coaches, and we want two Black coaches to be put in the head and assistant coaches places,” he said.

According to Mr. McDaniel, his son said he and Mickey were in the field house weight room for football practice. Some White guys began saying “they were going to lynch and hang all n——s,” Mr. McDaniel solemnly recounted. The White students took shoelaces, made nooses, and then hung the shoelaces around the jerseys of Black players, he continued. They then took pants and bladder bags used for injuries, shoes, made a complete dummy, and hung the dummy, Mr. McDaniel said.

Then students took a rope tied into a noose and placed it around Mickey’s head but couldn’t tighten it, Mr. McDaniel said. When his son McKay, 14, jumped up and helped to fight the other boys off, two boys grabbed MaKye, took the rope off of Mickey’s neck and tried to place it around his, said the boy’s father.

MaKye was able to fight them off, Mr. McDaniel said.

“The first thing I thought was the safety of my children. My second reaction was I’m angry, very upset at the coaches and the school because they failed to protect my child,” Mr. McDaniel added.

According to Mr. McDaniel, no one from the school has reached out to his family except to say students were suspended. But even that response followed an e-mail from his wife asking what happened to their son, Mr. McDaniel explained.

Everyone involved in the incident is back at school and on the football team, except one boy, according to Mr. McDaniel. He suspects what he sees as lenient discipline may have happened because one boy involved is the son of a coach and another is the son of a school board member. “All of the boys’ parents are either affiliated with the school or local government,” he charged.

Calls to school officials were not returned to confirm or deny the allegation.

Mr. McDaniel is concerned for his son’s safety and the safety of the other Black students as they travel for remaining football games. He said he has no indication steps have been taken by the school or football team to make sure Black players are safe.

Wynne and its surrounding areas are saturated with members of the Ku Klux Klan, said Mr. McDaniel. He is fearful of how Black players could be treated during road trips and games.

“We’ve had the Klan march in our city twice. I’ve experienced it both times. I grew up fighting physical racial fights all my life so I’m no stranger to this type of hostile racial environment,” Mr. McDaniel said.

The incident has affected his family, Mr. McDaniel added. He suffers from anxiety and his wife is afraid to leave the house or work the family business, a sports bar and grill, he said.

“My concern is how will they treat these Black kids on and off the field? My son has to look over his shoulder. Will there be foul play on the field?” he asked.

Here is a video update. The police decided to leave it to the school board to dole out punishment.

WOW. I truly hope both of these children and their parents get the justice they deserve. I hope they take legal action and I hope it goes as far as it can. Truly hoping.

A white woman in the video interview said that it’s a good school but sometimes “makes mistakes”. Um, white students trying to lynch black students is NOT a mistake. That is as obviously racist hate crime as it gets and should be treated as such.

Meanwhile the only black person commenting on the issue did not show their face in fear of retaliation. That alone tells me a lot. 

thepeoplesrecord:

South Africa’s’ Amplats fires 12,000 strikers as unrest deepens
October 5, 2012

Anglo American Platinum (Amplats) fired 12,000 wildcat strikers on Friday, a high-stakes attempt by the world’s biggest platinum producer to push back at a wave of illegal stoppages sweeping through South Africa’s mining sector and beyond.

The rand fell sharply after the announcement, suggesting investors fear the sackings could worsen what is shaping up to be the most damaging period of labor unrest in Africa’s biggest economy since the end of apartheid in 1994.

Police shot dead one striking miner overnight, bringing the death toll in two months of unrest to 48. Strikes have spread beyond the mining sector, with Shell declaring on Friday that it would not be able to honor contracts to deliver fuel near Johannesburg because of a trucking strike.

The unrest is causing political trouble for President Jacob Zuma and his ruling African National Congress (ANC), the veteran liberation movement with long-standing ties to labor unions.

“You fire 12,000 people, and it’s like ‘Oh my god, what happens now?’” one Johannesburg-based currency strategist said.

When rival Impala Platinum fired 17,000 workers in January to squash a union turf war, it led to a six week stoppage in which three people were killed, the company lost 80,000 ounces in output and platinum prices jumped 21 percent.

The police shooting of 34 strikers at Lonmin’s Marikana platinum mine on August 16 poisoned labor relations in the sector even more, and the hefty wage deal that ensued triggered copycat demands in gold and iron ore mines.

“Amplats had been giving signals that it was going to hold the line after Lonmin had folded - but it’s a huge gamble,” said Nic Borain, an independent political analyst.

“Someone had to take it on the chin or this would have kept on unraveling and spread through the economy. It’s difficult to know whether this causes the unrest to spread or whether it takes some of the sting out of it. It could go either way.”

Speaking to South Africa’s e-News television channel, one dismissed worker said Amplats was “starting a war”.

The ANC Youth League, a fierce critic of Zuma, lashed out at Amplats, which it said “has made astronomical profits on the blood, sweat and tears of the very same workers that today the company can just fire with impunity.”

“Amplats is a disgrace and a disappointment to the country at large, a representation of white monopoly capital out of touch and uncaring of the plight of the poor,” it said in a statement.

Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Palestinians storm streets in protest of economic stagnation 
September 11, 2012

Thousands of Palestinians clashed with police in protests over the economic stagnation caused by strict Israeli trade controls and a decline in Western aid. Officers fired tear gas and beat back protesters who had blocked roads with burning tires.

In this year’s largest display yet of public discontent with the Palestinian Authority, Palestinians across the West Bank voiced their unhappiness with recently implemented austerity measures.

The most violent clashes occurred in the city of Hebron, where hundreds of youths attempted to storm a police station, pelting it with rocks. Officers in riot gear responded, beating protesters back with truncheons and tear gas.

Demonstrators voiced anger over rising prices and unpaid salaries amid new austerity measures introduced by the government.

“Nobody is able to live, except the big officials. We have to pressure this government to change,” Sami Saleh, a 57-year-old taxi driver said to AFP.

The majority of public discontent was directed against Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad. Protesters in Hebron hurled shoes at a poster of the US-educated politician with the words ‘Depart Fayyad’ scrawled underneath. Activists then tore the poster down, trampled it and set it on fire.

Some protesters also called for the removal of President Mahmoud Abbas.

In response to the violent clashes PM Fayyad has lowered the price of fuel. Previously, the price of petrol in Palestine was $8.18 per gallon, more than double the US $3.59 per gallon.

PM Fayyad says claimed that the austerity measures were due to a budgetary shortfall caused by the failure of the US and Arab countries to deliver an expected $1.2 billion in financial aid.

Washington froze financial aid to the Palestinian Authority last year after it went against US wishes and made a bid for statehood in the United Nations. Obama lifted the freeze in April, but the funds have yet to arrive.

The Palestinian Authority has been unable to pay employees’ salaries for the last few months due to the aid default. The group employs some 150,000 civil servants, who are now struggling to make ends meet in the downturn. 
‘Palestine with its hands tied behind its back’

Economic factors are the catalyst for the dissatisfaction with the Palestinian Authority’s “inaction” in a number of pressing matters, political analyst Elias Zananiri said in an interview with RT.

“On the level of negotiations with Israel nothing is happening, there is frustration among the Palestinians. On the level of reconciliation with Hamas nothing is happening,” Zananiri said. “Nothing is moving on.”

He cited the trade disparity between Israel and Palestine as one of the root causes of the current economic woes.

The Palestinians buy an estimated $5 billion in products and services from Israel, while Israel buys only $50 million from Palestine, he said.

Source

Only when Palestine rules itself will it be able to thrive as a country. A crumbling economy, unlivable cities, food shortages, limited transportation & education opportunities are a direct result of the Israeli apartheid, funded nearly entirely by the United States. Palestinians have no other choice but to fight back.

SPAIN tonight July 10th 2012
Lamps shining, angry coal miners march on Madrid
By Gabriel Rubio (AFP) – 5 hours ago  

MADRID — Spanish coal miners marched on Madrid with their helmet lamps shining in the dark on Tuesday night in a demonstration against cuts to pit subsidies that they say will destroy thousands of jobs.
In their hard hats and blue overalls, some 400 miners marched down the broad avenues of the capital in an eye-catching march, the latest in weeks of protests that have erupted into violent clashes with police in the north.
Having hiked hundreds of miles from the northern mining regions, they also planned a bigger demonstration Wednesday morning, which unions hoped would draw at least 25,000 people.
The miners are protesting Madrid’s decision to slash coal industry subsidies this year to 111 million euros ($142 million) from 301 million euros last year, which they say threatens 30,000 jobs directly and indirectly.
They passed in front of the official residence of Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, figurehead of the economic cuts, yelling: “We are miners, not terrorists!” and “Here are the ones who get the coal out!”
They later headed for the central Puerta del Sol square, the symbolic hub of social protests, accompanied by thousands of local sympathisers.
Unions say the cuts will destroy coal mining, which relies on state aid to compete with cheaper imports.
"The fight is for something just, we are just coming to claim what is ours," said Manuel Cinoceda, a 55-year-old miner from Teruel who took early retirement, as his group entered Madrid earlier Tuesday.
He was one of 60 miners who marched from the region of Aragon and entered from the northeast into the capital where they joined with another column from two other northern mining regions: Asturias and Castile and Leon.
Weary from the hike, some of the Aragon protesters wore red scarves and black T-shirts reading “They want to end it all” or “No to the closure of coal mining,” as some passers-by shouted “Courage” and “Strength to you.”
Their progress through Madrid’s streets after a two-week journey on foot of more than 400 kilometres (250 miles) was hailed by car drivers beeping their horns and some fire engines sounding their sirens.
"Except for a few towns, we have been very warmly welcomed almost everywhere," said Antonio Risco, 52, who joined the Aragon marchers after leaving the Cordoban mining region of Guadiato de Penarroya.
"We have to make this government realise that the mining regions have to survive and coal, too, because it is a native energy, which comes from the country and is cheap," said Risco, who retired after 22 years’ work.
Spanish coal’s state subsidies are due to be eliminated by 2018 under European Union agreements.
Spain’s mines have been gradually closing over the past 20 years. Only around 40 are still active, mostly in the north, and they employ about 8,000 miners as well as sustaining other jobs indirectly.
Many towns rely on them, said Francisco Martin, a 35-year-old miner from the northern town of Arino.
"If they close this, there is nothing. They have had many years to re-industrialise but they have done nothing. If they close the mine, they throw us out and where are we going to go if there is nothing?"
The miners’ protests in the north, with miners firing rockets and police responding with rubber bullets, have been the most volatile in months of demonstrations in various sectors across Spain, against the cuts aimed at curbing the deficit.
"We’ll see if the effort we have made bears a reward," said Felix Lopez, 46, a miner from Aragon. "I don’t think it’s certain."

Copyright © 2012 AFP. All rights reserved. More »

peaceandphilosophy:

SPAIN tonight July 10th 2012
Gran vía / Pl. España -Madrid hace Unos minutos. Sin palabras #NOCHEminera #marchanegra #resistenciaminera #15m #indignados
SPAIN tonight July 10th 2012
Lamps shining, angry coal miners march on Madrid
By Gabriel Rubio (AFP) – 5 hours ago  

MADRID — Spanish coal miners marched on Madrid with their helmet lamps shining in the dark on Tuesday night in a demonstration against cuts to pit subsidies that they say will destroy thousands of jobs.
In their hard hats and blue overalls, some 400 miners marched down the broad avenues of the capital in an eye-catching march, the latest in weeks of protests that have erupted into violent clashes with police in the north.
Having hiked hundreds of miles from the northern mining regions, they also planned a bigger demonstration Wednesday morning, which unions hoped would draw at least 25,000 people.
The miners are protesting Madrid’s decision to slash coal industry subsidies this year to 111 million euros ($142 million) from 301 million euros last year, which they say threatens 30,000 jobs directly and indirectly.
They passed in front of the official residence of Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, figurehead of the economic cuts, yelling: “We are miners, not terrorists!” and “Here are the ones who get the coal out!”
They later headed for the central Puerta del Sol square, the symbolic hub of social protests, accompanied by thousands of local sympathisers.
Unions say the cuts will destroy coal mining, which relies on state aid to compete with cheaper imports.
"The fight is for something just, we are just coming to claim what is ours," said Manuel Cinoceda, a 55-year-old miner from Teruel who took early retirement, as his group entered Madrid earlier Tuesday.
He was one of 60 miners who marched from the region of Aragon and entered from the northeast into the capital where they joined with another column from two other northern mining regions: Asturias and Castile and Leon.
Weary from the hike, some of the Aragon protesters wore red scarves and black T-shirts reading “They want to end it all” or “No to the closure of coal mining,” as some passers-by shouted “Courage” and “Strength to you.”
Their progress through Madrid’s streets after a two-week journey on foot of more than 400 kilometres (250 miles) was hailed by car drivers beeping their horns and some fire engines sounding their sirens.
"Except for a few towns, we have been very warmly welcomed almost everywhere," said Antonio Risco, 52, who joined the Aragon marchers after leaving the Cordoban mining region of Guadiato de Penarroya.
"We have to make this government realise that the mining regions have to survive and coal, too, because it is a native energy, which comes from the country and is cheap," said Risco, who retired after 22 years’ work.
Spanish coal’s state subsidies are due to be eliminated by 2018 under European Union agreements.
Spain’s mines have been gradually closing over the past 20 years. Only around 40 are still active, mostly in the north, and they employ about 8,000 miners as well as sustaining other jobs indirectly.
Many towns rely on them, said Francisco Martin, a 35-year-old miner from the northern town of Arino.
"If they close this, there is nothing. They have had many years to re-industrialise but they have done nothing. If they close the mine, they throw us out and where are we going to go if there is nothing?"
The miners’ protests in the north, with miners firing rockets and police responding with rubber bullets, have been the most volatile in months of demonstrations in various sectors across Spain, against the cuts aimed at curbing the deficit.
"We’ll see if the effort we have made bears a reward," said Felix Lopez, 46, a miner from Aragon. "I don’t think it’s certain."

Copyright © 2012 AFP. All rights reserved. More »

peaceandphilosophy:

SPAIN tonight July 10th 2012
Gran vía / Pl. España -Madrid hace Unos minutos. Sin palabras #NOCHEminera #marchanegra #resistenciaminera #15m #indignados

SPAIN tonight July 10th 2012

Lamps shining, angry coal miners march on Madrid

MADRID — Spanish coal miners marched on Madrid with their helmet lamps shining in the dark on Tuesday night in a demonstration against cuts to pit subsidies that they say will destroy thousands of jobs.

In their hard hats and blue overalls, some 400 miners marched down the broad avenues of the capital in an eye-catching march, the latest in weeks of protests that have erupted into violent clashes with police in the north.

Having hiked hundreds of miles from the northern mining regions, they also planned a bigger demonstration Wednesday morning, which unions hoped would draw at least 25,000 people.

The miners are protesting Madrid’s decision to slash coal industry subsidies this year to 111 million euros ($142 million) from 301 million euros last year, which they say threatens 30,000 jobs directly and indirectly.

They passed in front of the official residence of Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, figurehead of the economic cuts, yelling: “We are miners, not terrorists!” and “Here are the ones who get the coal out!”

They later headed for the central Puerta del Sol square, the symbolic hub of social protests, accompanied by thousands of local sympathisers.

Unions say the cuts will destroy coal mining, which relies on state aid to compete with cheaper imports.

"The fight is for something just, we are just coming to claim what is ours," said Manuel Cinoceda, a 55-year-old miner from Teruel who took early retirement, as his group entered Madrid earlier Tuesday.

He was one of 60 miners who marched from the region of Aragon and entered from the northeast into the capital where they joined with another column from two other northern mining regions: Asturias and Castile and Leon.

Weary from the hike, some of the Aragon protesters wore red scarves and black T-shirts reading “They want to end it all” or “No to the closure of coal mining,” as some passers-by shouted “Courage” and “Strength to you.”

Their progress through Madrid’s streets after a two-week journey on foot of more than 400 kilometres (250 miles) was hailed by car drivers beeping their horns and some fire engines sounding their sirens.

"Except for a few towns, we have been very warmly welcomed almost everywhere," said Antonio Risco, 52, who joined the Aragon marchers after leaving the Cordoban mining region of Guadiato de Penarroya.

"We have to make this government realise that the mining regions have to survive and coal, too, because it is a native energy, which comes from the country and is cheap," said Risco, who retired after 22 years’ work.

Spanish coal’s state subsidies are due to be eliminated by 2018 under European Union agreements.

Spain’s mines have been gradually closing over the past 20 years. Only around 40 are still active, mostly in the north, and they employ about 8,000 miners as well as sustaining other jobs indirectly.

Many towns rely on them, said Francisco Martin, a 35-year-old miner from the northern town of Arino.

"If they close this, there is nothing. They have had many years to re-industrialise but they have done nothing. If they close the mine, they throw us out and where are we going to go if there is nothing?"

The miners’ protests in the north, with miners firing rockets and police responding with rubber bullets, have been the most volatile in months of demonstrations in various sectors across Spain, against the cuts aimed at curbing the deficit.

"We’ll see if the effort we have made bears a reward," said Felix Lopez, 46, a miner from Aragon. "I don’t think it’s certain."

peaceandphilosophy:

SPAIN tonight July 10th 2012

Gran vía / Pl. España -Madrid hace Unos minutos. Sin palabras #NOCHEminera #marchanegra #resistenciaminera #15m #indignados

Emergency Protests Against the Growing Threat of War Hands Off Syria and Iran!

Emergency Protests Against the Growing Threat of War

Hands Off Syria and Iran!

End the Drone Wars!

We Need Jobs, Education and Healthcare, Not Endless War!


The growing threats of war against Syria are alarming.  Recently, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton warned Russia not to get in the way of US backed efforts to force out the government of President Assad.  The corporate media is making every effort to overwhelm us with calls for another “Humanitarian War”.  The drum beat of aggression against Iran grows daily as well. The coup by the U.S. funded and trained Egyptian military, overturning the first popularly elected government in recent history is another ominous warning. The threat of new war is real while US drone attacks are an expanding form of anonymous war.

 

During the period from June 23 through July 1, there will be demonstrations, vigils and forum around the country to protest the growing threats of war.  Please join the protests in your city or organize one in your city.  A full list of locations will appear on this web site soon. Send information about your action to

UNACpeace@gmail.com


If NATO military actions is unleashed against Syria UNAC urging activists across the country to immediately call united “Day After” demonstrations within 24 hours at Federal Building across the U.S.

 

Actions during the week of June 23 to July1 are already being held in the following 25 cities:

 

1.   Minneapolis, MN,

2.   Chicago, IL,

3.   Detroit, MI,  

4.   Columbus, OH,  

5.   Boston, MA, 

6.   Northampton, MA, 

7.   Hartford, CT,

8.   Albany, NY,  

9.   Syracuse, NY, 

10.                  Rochester, NY,

11.                  Buffalo, NY,

12.                  NYC, NY, 

13.                  Brooklyn, NY, 

14.                  Jersey City, NJ, 

15.                  Newark, NJ, 

16.                  Philadelphia, PA, 

17.                  Washington DC, 

18.                  Tallahassee, FL, 

19.                  Colorado Springs, CO, 

20.                  Salt Lake City, UT, 

21.                  Durham, NC, 

22.                  Los Angeles, CA, 

23.                  Oakland, CA, a

24.                  Fresno, CA, 

25. Vancouver, CANADA 

thinkmexican:

SB 1070 Call to Action!

With today’s Supreme Court ruling, Arizona has once again become the epicenter for the struggle for human rights in the United States. Puente has organized Barrio Defense Committees to make sure the community stays informed in these times of fear and uncertainty, but they need your help to make sure the world hears their voice.

You can help by visiting Alto Arizona’s Action Center and by Signing a Petition.

We Will Not Comply!

(Source: thinkmexican)

TUESDAY APRIL 10th INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PROTEST FOR JUSTICE FOR TRAYVON MARTIN EVEN MORE CRITICAL IN THE WAKE OF SPECIAL PROSECUTOR’S “NO GRAND JURY” ANNOUNCEMENT

INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PROTEST FOR JUSTICE FOR TRAYVON MARTIN EVEN MORE CRITICAL IN THE WAKE OF SPECIAL PROSECUTOR’S “NO GRAND JURY” ANNOUNCEMENT

Demand Justice for Trayvon Martin – Tuesday, April 10 – 6 P.M. Union Square NYC

All who are planning to participate in worldwide protests on April 9 and 10 to demand justice for Trayvon Martin should consider recent developments regarding the grand jury as an important reason to double their efforts to make the protests massive and determined.

The announcement by special prosecutor Angela Corey that a grand jury — that had originally been scheduled to take up Trayvon Martin’s case on April 10 but is now not going to do that — can only be viewed as confusing at best and troubling at worse.

This is not the news that people across the country, indeed across the world, had been waiting to hear. Justice demands an arrest for murder, not another excuse for a delay — which is what the special prosecutor’s announcement amounts to.

Justice delayed is justice denied. Six weeks have come and gone since Trayvon was murdered for being Black and young. The prosecutors and police have had plenty of time to reverse their clumsy efforts to sweep this murder under the rug and do what every rational freedom-loving person demands: arrest George Zimmerman.

Yet, as of this date, the only people who have been arrested in the Trayvon Martin case, have been six students protesting for justice by blocking the doors of the Sanford, Fla. police station.

The delay of justice is unacceptable. The unprecedented mass movement for Trayvon that has blossomed over the last three weeks, can only view more delays as a sign that the powers that be are not yet getting the message: No justice, No peace.

Moreover, if the delay of justice continues, or if the special prosecutor announces that Mr. Zimmerman will not be arrested and charged with murder, the incredible protest that have already taken place in reaction to Trayvon’s murder, will pale in comparison to the mass outrage that such an announcement would provoke.

 

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